Low Level Laser Therapy

Low-level laser therapy is a safe form of light/heat treatment under investigation for a variety of health indications. It is being used to treat the genetic forms of hair loss common in men and women, androgenetic alopecia or pattern balding.
Low-level laser therapy is also called red light therapy, cold laser, soft laser, bio-stimulation and photobiomodulation.
Laser therapy used for hair loss treatment depends on devices that emit a light that can penetrate the scalp. Excimer (308 nm), helium-neon (632.8 nm), and fractional erbium-glass (1550 nm) lasers have been used. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) uses devices with diodes that emit red light (wavelength 630-670 nanometers)
Low-level laser therapy is intended for men and women with thinning hair or pattern baldness caused by a hereditary condition.
Physicians use a system known as the Norwood-Hamilton Classification (men) and the Ludwig-Savin Scale(women) to describe the degree of hair loss. Low-level laser therapy is intended for the promotion of hair growth in males who have Norwood Hamilton Classifications of IIa to V and in females who have Ludwig (Savin) I-4, II-1, II-2, or frontal patterns of hair loss and have Fitzpatrick skin phototypes I to IV.
Low-Level Laser Therapy, otherwise known as LLLT, is one of three recognized FDA approved treatment regimens for androgenetic alopecia in males and females. The FDA is known as the United States Food and Drug Administration and is a federal agency responsible for protecting public health. The FDA approved the LLLT laser comb for use in males for androgenetic alopecia in 2007 and subsequently approved its use in women in 2011.